Snacks & travel: why can’t I get this at home?

As an enthusiastic eater, one of my favourite things about travel is discovering new food, and more importantly when I’m on the go, new snacks. It’s somewhat possible to recreate a meal, or find the same fruit, but it is crushingly disappointing (for me) to come home and not be able to find a new favourite snack.

This started in Guatemala with Magnum ice cream bars, which were absurdly expensive. It carried on to Paris, where Granny Smith apple yogourt rocked my world.

When I got home, I even wrote the Danone people about that one. They were polite, but alas, we still have no green apple yogourt.

In Morocco, it was Fanta lemon soda. Delicious, refreshing, tart lemon soda. We do have lemon soda in Canada, but it’s terribly fancy ($$$) and not terribly mainstream. Forget tagines, Fanta lemon and harira soup quickly constituted my favourite Moroccan meal.

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In Spain, it got completely out of hand. First, the Fanta Lemon soda flows freely, then, I was introduced to the tangy magic of jamón potato chips:

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Don’t even get me started on my attempts to find jamón back home, a sad and fruitless adventure to say the least. After that, the cruelest snack of all is the Kit Kat ice cream treat. In Canada, we have dozens of Kit Kat incarnations, so it is unreasonable this has yet to translate to ice cream form:

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I don’t doubt that I’d eventually tire of all of these things, were they available in Canada, and it’s fairly safe to assume my affection for them is entirely nostalgia-related. Still, I could happily chow down on a bag of jamón chips, offset by the zip of an ice-cold lemon soda now, and almost any minute of the day.

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6 thoughts on “Snacks & travel: why can’t I get this at home?”

  1. Add Japanese seaweed filled rice-triangles to that list! Available at your local Japanese gas station, but alas not in Halifax. It is extra hard to recreate as I do not read japanese and literally have no idea what the different seaweed types/preparations or ingredient lists were! *sigh*

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